Sudden Death

Grief is a natural response to loss. It can be felt in many ways. Grief’s impact can be emotional, social, spiritual, physical and financial. It is as individual as the person you loved and lost. Grieving while living away from family and friends can be especially difficult. This is a place where you can share your thoughts, and get ideas on how to cope. It is here for you to get support and validation.

Re: Sudden Death

Postby andygetz » Mon Dec 15, 2014 9:58 am

If you have lost a loved one unexpectedly your suffering may be great and very unsettling. You may have had no time to prepare for the loss and no time to say goodbye. You many know "in your head" that this is your reality, your loved one is no longer physically here with you. In your heart it is another matter as you cannot understand their absence. You may be reviewing days and hours leading up to the incident and second guessing what you did and did not say or observe that might have produced a different outcome. Know that these struggles are part of trying to absorb this new reality. There is nothing you could have done differently to predict or prevent this loss. If you have discovered ways to be kinder to yourself in your suffering please share. If you have found strategies to take time to tolerate this new reality please comment. If you are learning to absorb that you could not have controlled these events let us know.
andygetz
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:07 pm

Re: Sudden Death

Postby andygetz » Mon Jul 13, 2015 1:14 pm

There seem to be stories in the news each day about sudden and unexpected loss. These stories may trigger difficult memories of your own struggles with sudden loss. If your loss is recent you may be feeling numb or extremely fragile. Healing takes time. This is especially true when there is not only sudden death but traumatic memories of how that death may have occurred. Your story may be too difficult to attach words to right now. Consider allowing someone to be present with you in silence. You may not be able to talk, to share what happened. Comfort may lie in the presence of someone kind who does not mind just "being there." Try to verbalize that is what you need (if this is true for you), to not be alone, to feel someone's hand in yours and to be free of needing to tell the details of what you have been through. GIve your brain time to absorb and adjust. Please comment if this speaks to an experience you have had or if you found other types of connection to be comforting.
andygetz
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:07 pm

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